The EPA is Changing Rodenticide Regulations to Mitigate Risk

The EPA has announced new rules for the sale and use of rodenticide. The final risk mitigation decision for ten rodenticides has been in the works for a few years now. It represents the work of many studies on the use and abuse of rodenticides.

The EPA has come to the conclusion that it needs to do something about us of rodenticides by homeowners. Professional pest control companies, who are highly regulated in their use of rodenticides, have long stated that homeowners are damaging their property, their health and the environment by untrained and irresponsible use of rodenticides.

Typical problems that Hearts Pest Management has found during many years of controlling rats and mice, is that homeowners
1) often fail to use proper personal protective equipment when handling rodenticides
2) will throw loose bait in and around their homes
3) do not take proper precautions to eliminate access to these baits from at risk children and pets

You can view information on control of mice and rats, gophers and squirrels, as well and birds and parasites, where you can read about the damage caused by these critters, as well as damage directly and indirectly caused by activities of property owners / occupants in their attempts to solve the problems.

Retailers will face many restrictions on the sale of rodenticides. One major change is that certain rodenticides simply will not be available to homeowners, except as provided as part of a service plan with a registered pest control company. These rodenticides are primarily ones that persist in the animal for some time, accumulating in their systems and potentially transferable to other species. The second major change eliminates the habit of homeowners who throw bait in their attics and around their properties, is that now it will be required that retail stores must sell rodenticides contained within rodent tamper resistant bait stations.

Businesses facing rodent problems will also need to comply with a new set of regulations governing acceptable rodent solutions and self-treatments.

I think it is important to share with you that the Environmental Protection Agency is not in the business of making money for pest control companies. If the EPA is creating requirements that will of necessity cause a broad section of the public to turn to professional pest control companies, it is because the EPA has come to the conclusion that this work requires a licensed pest control professional for the safety of the public. This is not to imply that pest control is safe. It is not. But pest control professionals are licensed and trained to handle rodenticides according the the pesticide label and MSDS (Medical Safety Data Sheet).

You can find more information about a variety of rodenticides from our product list of rodenticides. Please be aware that we are always in the process of reviewing the products we use and that the products at your home or business may change with regulations and the introduction of better products.

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